ISSN : 2146-3123
E-ISSN : 2146-3131

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In this population-based case-control study, 22,677 cases of rheumatoid arthritis are matched to 90,013 controls, with a median follow-up of 10 years before rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis. The odds of developing rheumatoid arthritis are 60% higher in those exposed to antibiotics than in those not exposed (OR 1.60; 95% CI 1.51-1.68). A dose- or frequency-dependent association is observed between the number of previous antibiotic prescriptions and rheumatoid arthritis. Antifungal (OR = 1.27; 95% CI 1.20-1.35) and antiviral (OR = 1.19; 95% CI 1.14-1.24) prescriptions are also associated with increased odds of rheumatoid arthritis. Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6685281/pdf/12916_2019_Article_1394.pdf.
In this meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials published published online June 19, 2019 in JAMA cardiology that included more than 83 000 participants, vitamin D supplementation was not associated with reduced risks of major adverse cardiovascular events, myocardial infarction, stroke, cardiovascular disease mortality, or all-cause mortality compared with placebo. These results suggest that vitamin D supplementation may not confer cardiovascular protection and may not be indicated for this purpose. Source: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamacardiology/fullarticle/2735646
In a study from Denmark, total 2224 overweight individuals (1504 women, 720 men) followed a low-calorie diet (810 kcal/daily) for 8 weeks. The low-calorie diet induced different effects in women than in men, suggesting gender‐specific changes after weight loss. Body weight loss and reductions in a metabolic syndrome score, fat mass, and heart rate were more marked in men compared to women. However, reductions in HDL-cholesterol, hip circumference, lean body mass (or fat free mass), and pulse pressure were larger in women than in men. Source:  https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/dom.13466
Louisa Gibson and Melanie Porter from Australiaaimed to investigate whether drinking or smoking while breastfeeding lowers children’s cognitive scores. They analyzed the data obtained from 5107 Australian infants recruited in 2004 and assessed every 2 years. The authors observed that exposing infants to alcohol through breastmilk may cause dose-dependent reductions in their cognitive abilities. The reduction in cognitive abilities was observed at age 6 to 7 years but was not sustained at age 10 to 11 years. The authors stated that although the relationship is small, it may be clinically significant when mothers consume alcohol regularly or binge drink.  Source: http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/142/2/e20174266
According to a meta-analysis performed by Clarke MA et al. 9% of women with postmenopausal bleeding have endometrial cancer. The authors analyzed data from 40790 unique patients in 129 studies published January 1, 1977, through January 31, 2017. They found that 90% of women with endometrial cancerhave postmenopausal bleeding; however, only 9% of women with postmenopausal bleeding were diagnosed with endometrial cancer.  Source: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/article-abstract/2695509
In the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study included a total of 50, 943 mothers recruited from 2002 to 2008 and their children, it was found that pregnant women with average (50–199 mg/day, 44%), high (≥200–299 mg/day, 7%) and very high (≥300 mg/day, 3%) caffeine intakes had an increased risk of their child experiencing excess growth in infancy compared with women with low caffeine intake (<50 mg/day, 46%). There was an association between in utero exposure to caffeine  and higher risk of overweight at age 3 years and 5 years, this association persisted at 8 years, only for very high exposures. The researchers concluded that "any caffeine consumption during pregnancy is associated with a higher risk of excess infant growth and of childhood overweight, mainly at preschool ages."  Source:  http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/8/3/e018895

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Ferda Işıkçelik, İsmail Ağırbaş, Cansın Tulunay Kaya
329 patients diagnosed with coronary artery disease and treated with bare-metal or drug-eluting stents are evaluated retrospectively with cost-effectiveness analysis from the perspective of the reimbursement institution. As a result of decision tree analysis, the weighted cost of treatment with a bare-metal stent…
Oğuz Yüksel, Mehmet Ateş, Servet Kızıldağ, et al.
In order to investigate the effects of voluntary physical activity on oxytocin, anxiety, and empathy levels, male and female mice are made to exercise in running wheel cages for 6 weeks. As a response to exercise, both the brain and serum oxytocin levels increase in female mice; however, in males…
Jaime A. Oliver, Jaime Gómez-Millán, Jose A. Medina, et al.
The clinical relevance of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase in rectal adenocarcinoma in 29 rectal adenocarcinoma patients are evaluated. The O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase gene promoter is methylated in 81.5% of samples. O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase methylation status is not correlated with…
Barış Arslan, Hasan Murat Gündüz, Nurdan Ünlü, et al.
A 60-year-old male patient with a history of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma initially presents with symptoms including abdominal pain and distention, nausea, and vomiting. Three days after open abdominal surgery due to adhesive small bowel obstruction, he develops…
Peng An, Yu Wang, Li-min Xing, et al.
A 1.5-year-old Egyptian boy is presented with widespread, brownish, hyperkeratotic, and slightly verrucous plaques on the skin, since the age of two months. The patient has no history of blistering or generalized cutaneous redness at or after birth. Upon physical examination, brownish, verrucous plaques…

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A 1.5-year-old Egyptian boy is presented with widespread, brownish, hyperkeratotic, and slightly verrucous plaques on the skin, since the age of two months. The patient has no history of blistering or generalized cutaneous redness at or after birth. Upon physical examination, brownish, verrucous plaques…

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The effort to maintain the editorial freedom has posed distinct challenges arising from regional dynamics in the Balkan region, as in any part of the world. For a journal to be successful in the international arena, reasonably organized managerial processes are required. Clear definitions of work packages, workflows, duties and responsibilities, and assignment and dismissal criteria are essential for the transparency of managerial processes. The journal’s owner, editor-in-chief, editorial board, publisher, and authors effectively communicating with each other within the framework of rules will prevent chaotic and destructive conflicts that may harm the reputation and its mission. The attempt to establish a legal regulation, an agreement between the owner and the editor, and an ombudsman began approximately five years ago for Balkan Medical Journal. Throughout this process, the journal’s management has endeavored to consult the opinions of the journal’s owner and the university legal regulation committee to establish a legal regulation for the journal that is ethical, practical, sustainable, and conforms to the national laws and international scientific values. We believe the journal legal regulation, finalized in January 2019 and presented below, serves as a role model for all scientific circles and the Balkans and will contribute to the advancement of institutional scientific publications of medicine in the region. The journal’s editorial board extends its gratitude to all current and past employees, the Dean’s of the Faculty of Medicine of Trakya University, and to the current rectorate of Trakya University for their valuable contributions and encouragement to building the development of the journal legal regulation to protect editorial freedom and provide successful journal management of all Trakya University scientific journals.  
Balkan Medical Journal follows ICMJE recommendations. The ICMJE require authors to submit a data-sharing statement for randomized clinical trials. Authors must provide a data-sharing notification to indicate whether data will be shared. According to ICMJE “Data sharing statements must indicate the following: whether individual deidentified participant data (including data dictionaries) will be shared; what data in particular will be shared; whether additional, related documents will be available (e.g., study protocol, statistical analysis plan, etc.); when the data will become available and for how long; by what access criteria data will be shared (including with whom, for what types of analyses, and by what mechanism)” (for details: http://www.icmje.org/recommendations/browse/publishing-and-editorial-issues/clinical-trial-registration.html). Balkan Medical Journal require authors to submit a data-sharing statement and register a data-sharing plan when registering a clinical trial on or after Jan 1, 2019.