ISSN : 1300-6045
E-ISSN : 1309-2251

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News See All

14th EASE Conference, Bucharest 2018 The 14th EASE Conference will be held in Bucharest, Romania, 8th-10th June, 2018. The theme for the event will be ‘Balancing Innovation and Tradition in Science Editing’. The theme is relevant to editors in Eastern Europe and the Balkans, but also to editors anywhere working independently or in small offices.   Source: http://www.ease.org.uk/ease-events/14th-ease-conference-bucharest-2018/
European Medicines Agency (EMA) launches a survey that assesses awareness of patients and doctors about arrangements for reporting of side effects The European Medicines Agency (EMA) has launched a survey. The objective of the survey is to assess the awareness, attitudes and reporting behaviors of patients and healthcare professionals to report adverse drug reactions, including for medicines under ‘additional monitoring’. The questionnaire is available in all official European Union languages. It will be open for responses until 9 October 2017. EMA and the European Commission will analyze the results of the survey and the conclusions will be published in 2018. Source:http://www.ema.europa.eu/ema/index.jsp?curl=pages/news_and_events/news/2017/09/news_detail_002807.jsp&mid=WC0b01ac058004d5c1
A recent mouse study at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine demonstrated that a high-fat, or ketogenic, diet not only increases longevity, but improves physical strength.   Jon Ramsey, senior author of the article in Cell Metabolism (September 2017), said “We expected some differences, but I was impressed by the magnitude we observed — a 13 percent increase in median life span for the mice on a high-fat versus high-carb diet. In humans, that would be seven to 10 years. But equally important, those mice retained quality of health in later life.” Source: https://www.ucdavis.edu/news/eat-fat-live-longer http://www.cell.com/cell-metabolism/fulltext/S1550-4131(17)30490-4
American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) and World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) reported that eating whole grains daily, such as brown rice or whole-wheat bread, reduces colorectal cancer risk, with the more you eat the lower the risk.   Diet, Nutrition, Physical Activity and Colorectal Cancer also found that the risk of colorectal cancers increases with regular consumption of hot dogs, bacon and other processed meats. A strong evidence that physical activity protects against colon cancer exists. The report is part of the Continuous Update Project (CUP). This project is an ongoing analysis of the global research on how diet, nutrition, physical activity and weight affect cancer risk and survival. Source: http://www.aicr.org/press/press-releases/2017/new-report-whole-grains-link-to-lower-colorectal-cancer-risk-for-first-time.html
First International Health Sciences Congress will be held in Balkan Congress Center, Edirne on 23-25 November 2017. Congress website: http://atuc2017-en.trakya.edu.tr  

Articles See All

Zafer Koçak, Necdet Süt, Ahmet Asan
Between January 2016 and May 3, 2017, Balkan Medical Journal had been cited 338 times by 275 journals from 32 countries. Among these; 70% are original articles, 19% are invited reviews, 7% are letters, 3% are editorial materials and remaining 1% are the others. As a summary, 89% of cited-articles consist of original articles and invited reviews
Julie Y. An, Abhinav Sidana, Peter L. Choyke, et al.
There is great a potential for mpMRI to improve outcomes and quality of treatment. The major roles of MRI will continue to expand and its emerging use in standard of care approaches becomes more clearly defined and supported by increasing levels of data. Active surveillance has gained popularity as an acceptable management option for men with low-risk prostate cancer. Successful utilization of this strategy can delay or prevent unnecessary interventions - thereby reducing morbidity associated with overtreatment. The usefulness of active surveillance primarily depends on correct identification of patients with low-risk disease. However, current population-wide algorithms and tools do not adequately exclude high-risk disease, thereby limiting the confidence of clinicians and patients to go on active surveillance. Novel imaging tools such as mpMRI provide information about the size and location of potential cancers enabling more informed treatment decisions. The term "multiparametric" in prostate mpMRI refers to the summation of several MRI series into one examination whose initial goal is to identify potential clinically-significant lesions suitable for targeted biopsy. The main advantages of MRI are its superior anatomic resolution and the lack of ionizing radiation. Recently, the Prostate Imaging-Reporting and Data System has been instituted as an international standard for unifying mpMRI results. The imaging sequences in mpMRI defined by Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System version 2 includes: T2-weighted MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI, derived apparent-diffusion coefficient from diffusion-weighted MRI, and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. The use of mpMRI prior to starting active surveillance could prevent those with missed, high-grade lesions from going on active surveillance, and reassure those with minimal disease who may be hesitant to take part in active surveillance. Although larger validation studies are still necessary, preliminary results suggest mpMRI has a role in selecting patients for active surveillance. Less certain is the role of mpMRI in monitoring patients on active surveillance, as data on this will take a long time to mature. The biggest obstacles to routine use of prostate MRI are quality control, cost, reproducibility, and access. Nevertheless, there is great a potential for mpMRI to improve outcomes and quality of treatment. The major roles of MRI will continue to expand and its emerging use in standard of care approaches becomes more clearly defined and supported by increasing levels of data.
Zeynep Soyman, Sefa Kelekçi, Veysel Sal, et al.
Apigenin is a plant-derived compound belonging to the flavone class, which possess antioxidant, free-radical-scavenging and anti-inflammatory properties. Administration of apigenin has no significant protective effect on ovarian reserve and tissue damage in ovarian ischemia/reperfusion injury Background: Apigenin is a plant-derived compound belonging to the flavone class, which possess antioxidant, free-radical-scavenging and anti-inflammatory properties. Aims: To address the effects of apigenin on serum anti-mullerian hormone levels, tissue oxidative stress parameters and histopathological changes in ovarian ischemia/reperfusion injury. Study Design: Animal experiment. Methods: Twenty-eight female Wistar albino rats were randomly separated into four sections: Sham operation (group 1), ischemia/reperfusion plus saline (group 2), ischemia/reperfusion plus dimethyl sulfoxide (group 3) and ischemia/reperfusion plus apigenin (group 4). In all ischemia/reperfusion groups, a bilateral adnexal 3-h period of ischemia was performed, followed by 3-h of reperfusion. A single dose of 15 mg/kg apigenin was given intraperitoneally 60 min before reperfusion in group 4. After 3-h of reperfusion, both ovaries were removed, and blood samples were collected. The main outcome measures were serum anti-mullerian hormone levels, ovarian tissue malondialdehyde, total nitric oxide, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione levels and histopathological damage scores. Results: The ovarian tissue nitric oxide level was significantly lower, and the glutathione level was significantly higher in group 4 compared with groups 2 and 3. There was no significant difference in anti-mullerian hormone levels among the three ischemia/reperfusion groups. The histopathological damage score was lower in group 4 than in groups 2 and 3 (p>0.05). Conclusion: Administration of apigenin has no significant protective effect on ovarian reserve and tissue damage in ovarian ischemia/reperfusion injury.
Mehmet Emre Arı, Filiz Ekici
15-year-old girl having a seizure was brought to the emergency room. She took 1.5 g propafenone for suicidal intention. She had metabolic acidosis. Long QRS interval and ST elevation in leads V1 through V3 were seen on electrocardiography. Background: Brugada syndrome is an inherited arrhythmogenic disease that may cause sudden cardiac death due to ventricular fibrillation in young adults. Brugada syndrome caused by propafenone intoxication has been noted rarely in the literature. We report a rare case, Brugada phenocopy due to propafenone intoxication and its treatment. Case Report: A 15-year-old girl having a seizure was brought to the emergency room. She took 1.5 g propafenone (Rythmol, Abbott, Chicago, IL, USA) for suicidal intention. She had metabolic acidosis. Long QRS interval and ST elevation in leads V1 through V3 were seen on electrocardiography. After bicarbonate infusion for 4 hours, haemodynamic and neurologic findings were recovered, and all electrocardiography abnormalities disappeared. The Brugada-like electrocardiography pattern was not recognized in her surface and 24-hour Holter electrocardiography at follow-up. Ajmaline challenge test was negative 2 weeks later. Conclusion: Absence of symptoms and documented ventricular tachycardia, negative challenge test, and a negative family history demonstrated that the Brugada phenocopy was a transient finding in this case and related to propafenone intoxication.
Konstantinos Laios, George Androutsos, Marilita M. Moschos
Aretaeus of Cappadocia is a controversial figure in the history of ancient Greek medicine.  No one denied that he was a physician who formed the most accurate descriptions of diseases in antiquity. Such an example is his to the point analysis about phthisis, which, according to modern medicine, can be identified as pulmonary tuberculosis in Chapter VIII of his First Book on Chronic Diseases.

News from Balkan Medical Journal See All

At the end of the last year, we, editorial team, decided to redesign our website to better serve our readers, reviewers and authors. After much hard work, we are excited to officially announce the new and improved Balkan Medical Journal website. You can now reach us at http://balkanmedicaljournal.org/ We thought that it was important to renew the website to reach a wider audience. So, we wanted to have good, clear, easy-to-follow navigation throughout our website. The new website will remain both open access and free of article processing charges. We hope that the website will respond better to our readers’ needs and interests. Key features of the new website include: Drop down menus to make easier to navigate and improve content layout and design, Pre-submission inquiry to allow author to have quick feedback from Balkan Medical Journal’s Editors regarding the suitability of a manuscript for the journal, Image corner which is created from clinical images published in the latest issues for teaching and training purposes, News section to stay up-to-date on the latest with health news and health science, Articles section which is composed of selected publications from current issue, Email alert feature to keep you up-to-date with content of the journal, We provide you with necessary information about citing in How to Cite, Advanced Search gives you opportunity to find what you seek more easily, Select articles you want and make the site to show them with View Selected Articles, You can share your favorite articles with your colleagues on social media with Share feature. We would like to thank our publisher, Galenos Publishing House, for their tremendous support and effort. For any questions, suggestions, feedback or comments, please contact us via E-mail. Zafer Koçak Editor in Chief, Balkan Medical Journal Department of Radiation Oncology, Trakya University School of Medicine, Edirne, Turkey Çetin Hakan Karadağ Web Editor, Balkan Medical Journal Department of Pharmacology, Trakya University School of Medicine, Edirne, Turkey